8 AM to 10PM Eastern Time
4 AM to 6PM Pacific Time
HomeFind Your TransmissionOur WarrantyContact UsOur Store

Stock Rebuild
Take your time, read all about it, chat with us, give us a call, ask lots of questions.  Then, when you've made up your mind which Rebuilt Transmission is the right transmission for your car . . . call us and we'll get started!
GM TransmissionsFORD TransmissionsCHRYSLER TransmissionsUsed Transmissions

Today's Price
$810.00
F
M
4X4 Heavy Duty - 9" Tail   2 WD
For Vehicles with up to 275 HP, and only mild modifications, you get the ride you want with a little more "umph!"
Same Old Same Old, but it works like new!
High Performance/Racing - 
6" Tail  2 WD
Improved 
2WD Heavy Duty - 6" Tail
 Heavy Duty - 4X4
Extra Heavy Duty - 4X4
Stock
High Performance/Racing - 
9" Tail  2 WD
The Patriot stock rebuild th350 is a 3spd transmission. It is for cars and trucks with stock engines or engines with mild upgrades with up to 275 horse power. Your new Patriot Trans has updates and upgrades that will make it perform better and last longer than a factory Trans so it will shift just a bit firmer than your old one but not too much to be uncomfortable your patriot stock transmission is assembled with quality parts checked and inspected and engineered to perform dependably and have a long service life. The Trans must be installed with proper torque converter to flywheel clearance and the T/V cable adjustments are critical. Enjoy your new Patriot transmission.

YOUR NEW PATRIOT TRANSMISSION DOES NOT COME WITH NEW SPEEDO GEARS, IF YOU ARE REPLACING A LIKE KIND TRANS, WE RECOMMEND USING YOUR ORIGINAL SPEEDO GEARS. IF YOU WILL NEED SPEEDO GEARS PLEASE CONTACT US FOR THE CORRECT GEARS FOR YOUR VEHICLE.

THM350 Technical Description

The Turbo Hydra-matic 350 was first used in 1969 model cars. It was developed jointly by Buick and Chevrolet to replace the two-speed Super Turbine 300 and aluminium-case Powerglide transmissions. So, although it carries the Turbo Hydra-matic name, the Hydra-matic Division of General Motors had little, if anything, to do with its design. The 350 and its 250, 250c, 350c and 375b derivatives have been manufactured by Buick in its Flint, Michigan, plant and by Chevrolet in Toledo and Parma, Ohio, and Windsor, Ontario.

Some would suggest that the THM350 (or Turbo 350 as called by drag racers and car enthusiasts) was based on the earlier Buick Super Turbine 300 — some components interchange between the two. Both Chevrolet and Buick divisions produced the THM350.

The THM350 was also regarded as a 'three speed Powerglide' and during its development, was generally called this. Although it uses the same torque converter as the THM400 (sans variable pitch stator) it has a familial resemblance to the 1962-'73 Aluminum Powerglide from Chevrolet and was largely derived from the Chevrolet design. One important difference in the THM350 compared to the THM400 is there is no fixed center support midway through the geartrain, this important difference in layout permitted THM350 to be adapted to the Corvair where the drive and driven ends are the same. This feature was not exploited but Corvair may have eventually used the THM350 had it remained in production, and Chevrolet was experimenting with mid-engine Corvette designs that might also have used this advantage had they ultimately reached production. Air cooled versions (with a baffle on the torque converter and air intakes cast into the bellhousing) of the THM350 appeared mid-1972 in Chevrolet Vega and Nova 6.

There is a rumor that the reason for the THM350's release after the THM400, is that although the THM350 had been in development longer (disputable), it often failed under heavy torque loads. One THM350 weak point was excessive end-play between the pump and center support and resulting wobble of the direct clutch drum due to both the end play and use of a relatively narrow bushing in the drum. This weak point can be addressed by using an extra thrust washer between the planetary gear and direct clutch to remove the end play and using a wider aftermarket bushing in the direct clutch drum. Another weak point is the relatively thin center support and the lightweight matching splines in the case. This weakness can be addressed by using an inexpensive aftermarket case saver kit. It is claimed that fixing these two issues will result in a THM350 that is as durable and reliable as a THM400.

4-Wheel drive truck applications for the THM350 used an iron adapter that mated the THM-350 to the transfer case directly, similar to the THM400. The THM350 adapter was cast iron and used a sliding sleeve to couple the transmission output shaft to the transfer case input shaft with a steel coupler sleeve that was splined to accept both shafts and couple them together. An internal snap ring inside the coupler sleeve controlled the sleeve's position on the shafts, with circular seals in the adapter sealing the transmission from the transfer case.

Around 1980, a lock-up torque converter was introduced; this transmission was phased out in 1984 in GM passenger cars for the 700R4. Chevrolet/GMC trucks and vans used the THM350-C until 1986. The lock-up torque converter was deemed unpopular with transmission builders — B&M Racing once marketed a conversion kit for THM350-Cs during the early 1980s until the advent of high-stall lock-up torque converters when its overdrive counterpart (THM700R4/4L60) were modified. The standard TH350 is still very popular in drag racing.
6", 9" and 4x4.